Page 932 - Dress For Excess

11th Jul 2017, 6:00 AM
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Dress For Excess
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Newbiespud 11th Jul 2017, 6:00 AM edit delete
Newbiespud
Any stories about a DM or a player insisting on a seemingly minor aspect?

34 Comments:

Guest 11th Jul 2017, 6:01 AM edit delete reply
300 comic strips later...
andreas002 11th Jul 2017, 6:10 AM edit delete reply
andreas002
Only 300? You're far too optimistic.
Guest 12th Jul 2017, 5:02 AM edit delete reply
You mean pessimistic. Rarity leaving is a bad thing.
Cyborg7221 11th Jul 2017, 6:21 AM edit delete reply
Actually, 300 strips ago was the end of Running of the Leaves. Wow. This arc has taken forever. O_O
Digo Dragon 11th Jul 2017, 6:53 AM edit delete reply
Digo Dragon
NewbieSpud's The Fid 300

Dash: "Tonight, we level up in hell!!"
albedoequals1 11th Jul 2017, 6:46 AM edit delete reply
albedoequals1
Stories? I dunno, they all run together. In my group, that's just how we are. Everyone has their pet flavor item which they are willing to die rather than give up. Literally, one of my players got herself almost killed at least three times because of the way the character RP'd, and only lived one time because I fudged for her. (She was too much fun to lose, sue me. :P)
khyrin 11th Jul 2017, 10:58 AM edit delete reply
a month ago, running a tourney dungeon, a player decided that they wanted to be quirky and refused to travel west. not to slay things, not to explore the area, not to SAVE HIS LIFE... guess where the escape vessel was.

the Face ended up bluffing him that north was west, because we would have lost points if we left him for dead.
Digo Dragon 11th Jul 2017, 6:57 AM edit delete reply
Digo Dragon
This might worry some, but in my current D&D group the ability to let the PCs move their cohorts on the battle mat is apparently a minor aspect to our GM. Often he'll move them and have them do whatever. But this is really a huge detail for us, especially to the Monk's player and myself who are pretty good at battle tactics (well, the monk more considering he's a retired US Marine) and sometimes survival of a battle can come down to where you are standing.
aerion111 11th Jul 2017, 8:14 AM edit delete reply
aerion111
Since I play mostly via 'play by post', so someone spending an hour on a tangent means it took them, say, 5 hours to respond rather than 4, I both see a lot of such 'seemingly minor' things, and yet it rarely causes trouble.
But when it does interfere with the game, such as when it requires a GM response, it's usually my fault.

Best non-interfering example I can think of is spending about an half-hour choosing and re-choosing the 'tea' related items, accessories, and character traits in GURPS.
As in, I had a character that loved tea as a minor trait - Specifically a traveling water-mage, in a desert setting, that dabbled in magical-item trade (because being a mage let him spot non-magical forgeries, whereas a normal person would need to rely on the usual counter-forgery)
And he had a bit of starting cash left to spend (because he had to be somewhat rich to afford magic items, and GURPS only lets you increase wealth in large jumps)
So I spent ages trying to find the perfect balance between getting the fanciest tea and tea-gear I could get, not spending too much, and fitting it all on the pack-animal.
Actually, 30 minutes might be a low guess - I might have spent over an hour, if we include looking for ways to get more carrying capacity and such, not to mention my indecision over just HOW MUCH tea to carry along. (I believe in the end I had about 100 cups' worth of good tea (status 1, where status 0 is middle-class) and a couple of cups of really fancy Status 2 tea in case I have tea with royalty or something)

Really, the entire inventory for that guy might count; I spent about a day's worth of spare time picking out self-hygiene items (like a comb), dice, and so on, he even had cards with a pre-made back but a blank front so he could draw up the faces himself; he dabbled in art, on top of being a mage and a merchant.

The art might actually count as a second, more specific, example; The GM had given no indication that I'd have trouble selling the scrolls that was supposed to be my character's main 'civilian' income pre-adventure (or even that they'd care much about that kind of logistical stuff in their game)
And I still decided that prettying the scrolls up with art (GURPS scrolls are quite flexible, as far as definitions go) was a great idea that'd give me a foot up on the competition (would you rather pay 32 gold for the coarse-papered, chicken-scratch-written Summon Water scroll with no art, or 33-34 for a fancy, high-quality one with professional art in the margin and a professional-scribe level of hand-writing? Especially since you get to keep everything but the magical writing when you cast it, so now you've a fancy paper for sending letters back to your family or whatever)
Then I had to spend probably at least two hours in total, between reading up on what the art-types meant (especially Illumination, which was the closest I could find and not exactly a genre I'm very familiar with), followed by finding a way to reword Illumination as a 'custom' specialization that fit my image of the character better, and then figuring out what tools are suitable for an artist.
Because apparently GURPS doesn't have an 'artist's kit' the way they have for a 'scribe', so I eventually gave up and hoped the GM'd tolerate me making a double-cost, double-weight scribe's kit that had whatever brushes and colors I needed to also do art with it.
I think I opened that kit like two times in the entire game.
Referee 11th Jul 2017, 10:24 AM edit delete reply
I'd ask you some funny questions about the tea, but I might breach the spoiler clause in doing so...
aerion111 12th Jul 2017, 3:57 AM edit delete reply
aerion111
Not sure what it'd spoil, but maybe I'm just not remembering it?
Now I'm curious, but yeah, if you can't ask without spoiling MLP or whatever, don't.
I just can't think of anything that you might want to ask about the tea.
aerion111 12th Jul 2017, 3:58 AM edit delete reply
aerion111
Oh, if it's about a certain non-MLP uncle, then... I dunno how much of a sub-conscious influence that was (probably at least somewhat of one) but it wasn't a conscious influence.
Digo Dragon 11th Jul 2017, 10:24 AM edit delete reply
Digo Dragon
I tend to pay a lot of attention to my characters' wardrobe details. The actual designs, colors, number and positions of pockets... A lot of this is because as an artist I draw a lot of my characters, but it helps in game when I need to know if I can smuggle something tiny in the right pocket, or if I can make a disguise extra hard to spot when I hide...
Super_Big_Mac 12th Jul 2017, 11:07 AM edit delete reply
Super_Big_Mac
My Rogue had these sleeves that he'd put on, and they'd magically become any sort of outfit he wanted, as well as a +5 "Disguise Self" hat he got as a wedding gift from the Empress. I made sure to detail how his clothes looked every day, and even incorporated those items into my Rogue's day job as a dancer in a bar/club. 'Twas quite fun to think up silly costumes he'd be wearing.
Super_Big_Mac 12th Jul 2017, 11:10 AM edit delete reply
Super_Big_Mac
What do you mean by "play by post" d&d?

Do you mean like a forum thread kinda thing? 'Cause I tried that once (there was a FiMFiction group dedicated to Forum RPs), and it really sucked. Particularly because I like to put a bit of detail in my posts (such as saying "I scale this building and then snipe at that other guy"), and thus my posts would usually be completely buried by about 20 posts with a single sentence, varying in length from 3 words to 15 words. It kinda sucked, so if there's a place where it's actually playable and fun...
Skorzah 12th Jul 2017, 5:20 PM edit delete reply
Try Feral front, RPnation, or Xanje! They're made for it!
aerion111 12th Jul 2017, 6:09 PM edit delete reply
aerion111
I play mostly at 'rpol.net' myself - it has a frustrating tendency towards the games getting abandoned, but there ARE quite a few games that do manage to get some impressive post-counts. It's probably the low barrier to entry; A RL group takes days, if not weeks, to put together, so if you make it to session 1 you're clearly quite driven. Online, it's easier to get to session 1 without being quite prepared to GM a game, with all that includes.
But there's a huge difference between 'open' forum threads, which I agree are hopeless for DnD (at least if you're a slow writer like me, and apparently also you), and the 'we made a group and built characters the same way we'd do for any online group, but now instead of live skype-calls once a week, we're going to play through various text threads throughout the week' kind of setup.
It's more convenient if you want to RP-game at your own, slow, pace - especially if you can handle playing multiple games at once, since then you've other games to play while waiting for responses - and if you consider live voice-gaming inconvenient.
On rpol, while it varies a bit from group to group, it's generally considered rude to leave any one player behind too far.
austarrowsplitter 11th Jul 2017, 9:07 AM edit delete reply
In a Pathfinder campaign my wife was running, I was playing a magus with the Kensei and Bladebound archetypes. My character was one of two melee-focused characters in the group, the other being a catfolk Paladin, whose deity encouraged hard work followed by hard play. The minor thing I tended to focus on a lot was how much time my character spent practicing with his weapon, or cleaning it, which was a very stark contrast with how he behaved the rest of the time, namely the fact that he was a depressed drunk who was trying to forget. See, the character was a fallen samurai, who had betrayed his evil lord after his conscience kicked in. Of course, one does not simply throw off their culture in a single moment of clarity, and between the horrible things he'd done under the Bushido code, and the guilt from breaking his oaths to his former master, he had some issues. The training and the maintenance was his way of trying to hold on to what scraps of his sense of self that he had left as a warrior. Unfortunately, it ended up becoming important as, during a story-arc that had us on a boat for a good while, we ended up fighting a kelp devil, a ball of evil kelp that has mind control powers. My character failed his save against a charm effect, and started protecting his 'old friend' using nonlethal force, mostly by blocking the paladin's attacks. The party cleric tried using more mind-bending magic, with a spell that was designed to magically coerce the target into attacking their allies. This spell, my character makes his save against, as well as his Spellcraft roll to identify. Due to his issues, he attacks the cleric, and ends up one-shotting her with a critical channeled Shocking Grasp. This was adjudicated as the spell battering down the cleric's divine protections, leaving the way clear for that razor-sharp blade to cleanly decapitate her. Thankfully, the bard's plan of using yet more mind-control magic to get my character back on the party's side worked, and the kelp devil was swiftly defeated. The unfortunate side effect was the DM ruled that my character didn't remember the battle after he'd been charmed, and so everyone on the boat started actively shying away from my character, but nobody would tell him why. Eventually, the cleric forgave my character, still without explaining the reason why she was forgiving him, which just resulted in my character assuming he'd done something untoward while he was drunk, and resolving to stop drinking so much.
Dragonflight 11th Jul 2017, 9:33 AM edit delete reply
Wait...

You actually married one of those rare, impossible, *female gamers*?!

Hats off to you! That's awesome! :)
aylatrigger 11th Jul 2017, 10:50 AM edit delete reply
As a female gamer...I have seen a lot of other female gamers. My groups are mostly male, sure, but I do have a few female friends who do or did D&D, and many who do video games. (and I do too much D&D/pathfinder and video games...though according to my high school friends I don't count as female)
Skorzah 11th Jul 2017, 7:44 PM edit delete reply
Yeah… as a female gamer, and one that has it as a major part of her personality, and what I look for in friends… I have four women I can consider friends I can think of, which consist of my boyfriend's ex, his mother, his sister, and my father's current girlfriend, and she's paranoid that I hate her. I have way more male friends, and they're all gaming buddies. Long story short, I'm a huge introvert.
Anna 11th Jul 2017, 11:10 AM edit delete reply
Um... we're not unicorns, you know. Nor are we some kind of trophy. And I say this as a female gamer whose partner is also a female gamer.
Shad 11th Jul 2017, 10:29 AM edit delete reply
For a Discworld campaign, I played a vampire. Since I had to replace the blood addiction with a suitable other addiction, I chose sugar. In addition to my bag of cheap lollipops I had my carefully guarded bag of real sugar. It was quite fun taking the effort to use a lollipop every so often or when stressful events took place and keep track of how many I had left.
Shad 11th Jul 2017, 10:29 AM edit delete reply
For a Discworld campaign, I played a vampire. Since I had to replace the blood addiction with a suitable other addiction, I chose sugar. In addition to my bag of cheap lollipops I had my carefully guarded bag of real sugar. It was quite fun taking the effort to use a lollipop every so often or when stressful events took place and keep track of how many I had left.
Akouma 11th Jul 2017, 10:51 AM edit delete reply
Akouma
People being insistent on details? Well, my Iron Kingdoms game has our party track two very specific things. Firstly: the setting's calendar, including all major holidays, character birthdays, and deadlines. The other thing we track is the ledger of our mercenary company. (Which is part of why we track the date, since we pay our dudes monthly.)
Digo Dragon 11th Jul 2017, 12:18 PM edit delete reply
Digo Dragon
Speaking of minor aspected details, why the heck are the drinks in a bag next to the fridge?! Do they like warm drinks? That stuff should be chillin' *IN* the fridge!
Ganny 11th Jul 2017, 12:56 PM edit delete reply
Maybe they are hot drinks? Could be winter, out of game.
Digo Dragon 12th Jul 2017, 9:05 AM edit delete reply
Digo Dragon
I don't know. Hot drinks usually come in Styrofoam cups with cheap lids. I would think they'd keep them in a cardboard tray rather than in a bag.
Xelmon 12th Jul 2017, 10:34 PM edit delete reply
Since "Previously..." was last page, I'd assume everyone just got there and unpacking/arranging is only done minimally so far to get the game rolling.
Calvinball 11th Jul 2017, 12:43 PM edit delete reply
Recently one of my players received a magic weapon I homebrewed. It was affected by the magics of the Far Realms, so I said that on a random roll, she'd have nightmares as she slept. I expected this to be a minor point of flavor, but she wanted to know the odds. So I told her the dice.

What I didn't expect was for her to be incredibly excited about the prospect of having nightmares; I think it's because she got the notion that they were bonus content - extra stuff only she got to see. And the party ended up traveling a lot, so there were stretches of having a LOT of long rests to roll for.

I was pretty surprised she was so excited to see if her PC had a restless night or not.
Ganny 11th Jul 2017, 1:13 PM edit delete reply
Let's see here... I've got a few.

Currently my DnD group is on a Plane known as the Dreamscape, AKA the Land of Dreams. Well, going into it, the GM insisted that we had our online character sheets updated to precisely what the characters had. See, getting to the Dreamscape was the easy part. Getting resources (including food!) on the Dreamscape... that's another story entirely. This included clothing, tools, etc.

On the player side of things, my character got married before this little adventure, and planned out the catering (the group had saved an island and its people from being mystically dissolved in an artifact, and the guardian of said island owned a Bar/Tavern/Inn/Playhouse/Brothel) the wedding invitations (going to the different heroes we had helped and personally inviting them) as well as setting up dates for the other PCs for when the Wedding Announcement was made. This resulted in the GM, who likes having character art for every major NPC, having something like 50-odd pictures squeezed on a large flatscreen for the purpose of that little segment of the story. Also, my character keeps exhaustive notes, to the point where said notes are used as a form of currency with a group of Interplanar Librarians/Bankers/Researchers in universe.

After typing this out, I have come to realize that this campaign I'm in may have jumped the shark at some point. Or maybe that was part of the setting? Don't know.
Anvildude 11th Jul 2017, 7:56 PM edit delete reply
In my current Pathfinder campaign, my Deep Earth Sorcerer (think Toph, but an elderly dwarf man instead of a spunky little girl- still blind, though)... Has a Profession of Merchant. He's Elderly (as in, past Maximum Age threshold) and only just recently started as a level 2 Adventurer... Thus, he's been deeply involved in Mercantile pursuits for over 200 years.

The DM and the rest of the party aren't too worried about keeping track of food or minor monetary things... But Kilgal certainly is.

I've got a full list of gear with weight and value, a ledger of daily costs, pay attention to minor things like Outfits and the costs and weights of storage containers... I find it kinda fun, and hopefully it'll make things easier once our party successfully establishes an Adventurers Guild.
Wyvern 12th Jul 2017, 8:53 PM edit delete reply
We know that Toph would be happy to be played by an old Dwarf man, provided he was loud and assertive enough. :-)
bobcat 12th Jul 2017, 12:03 AM edit delete reply
Yes. I have stories about a player who insisted on too much detail.

We do NOT game with Dave anymore.